Wholistic Health Studio

12 Things Truly Confident People Do Differently
Huffpost - Dr. Travis Bradberry, Contributor

Confidence takes many forms, from the arrogance of Floyd Mayweather to the quiet self-assurance of Jane Goodall. True confidence-as opposed to the false confidence people project to mask their insecurities-has a look all its own.

 

When it comes to confidence, one thing is certain: truly confident people always have the upper hand over the doubtful and the skittish because they inspire others and they make things happen.

 

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t--you’re right. - Henry Ford

 

Ford’s notion that your mentality has a powerful effect on your ability to succeed is manifest in the results of a recent study at the University of Melbourne that showed that confident people went on to earn higher wages and get promoted more quickly than anyone else.

 

Learning to be confident is clearly important, but what is it that truly confident people do that sets them apart from everyone else?

 

I did some digging to uncover the 12 cardinal habits of truly confident people so that you can incorporate these behaviors into your repertoire.

 

1. They Get Their Happiness from Within
Happiness is a critical element of confidence, because in order to be confident in what you do, you have to be happy with who you are.

 

People who brim with confidence derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from their own accomplishments, as opposed to what other people think of their accomplishments. They know that no matter what anyone says, you’re never as good or as bad as people say you are.

 

2. They Don’t Pass Judgment
Confident people don’t pass judgment on others because they know that everyone has something to offer, and they don’t need to take other people down a notch in order to feel good about themselves. Comparing yourself to other people is limiting. Confident people don’t waste time sizing people up and worrying about whether or not they measure up to everyone they meet. (source)

 

The Best Exercise For Aging Muscles
The New York Times - By Gretchen Reynolds

The toll that aging takes on a body extends all the way down to the cellular level. But the damage accrued by cells in older muscles is especially severe, because they do not regenerate easily and they become weaker as their mitochondria, which produce energy, diminish in vigor and number.

 

A study published this month in “Cell Metabolism,” however, suggests that certain sorts of workouts may undo some of what the years can do to our mitochondria.

 

Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser.

 

So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established for their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exercise regimen.

 

Some of them did vigorous weight training several times a week; some did brief interval training three times a week on stationary bicycles (pedaling hard for four minutes, resting for three and then repeating that sequence three more times); some rode stationary bikes at a moderate pace for 30 minutes a few times a week and lifted weights lightly on other days. A fourth group, the control, did not exercise. (source)

 

How to Build Resilience in Midlife
The New York Times - By Tara Parker-Pope

Much of the scientific research on resilience - our ability to bounce back from adversity - has focused on how to build resilience in children. But what about the grown-ups?

 

While resilience is an essential skill for healthy childhood development, science shows that adults also can take steps to boost resilience in middle age, which is often the time we need it most. Midlife can bring all kinds of stressors, including divorce, the death of a parent, career setbacks and retirement worries, yet many of us don’t build the coping skills we need to meet these challenges.

 

The good news is that some of the qualities of middle age - a better ability to regulate emotions, perspective gained from life experiences and concern for future generations - may give older people an advantage over the young when it comes to developing resilience, said Adam Grant, a management and psychology professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. (source)