Special Event

CHANTING - NEW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Evening of Universal Chanting
w/Jon Seskevich
Saturday 7-9PM, 6/24
Register

Let the power of sound, vibrations and love release you from your worldly concerns and physical discomforts. No singing, chanting, or musical ability needed!

Chanting, a form of repetitive song, is part of many cultural and spiritual traditions. This is a heart-opening yoga practice. In Universal Chanting we use chants from several traditions, finding that each contains a transformative power and healing energy.

JON SESKEVICH, RN, BSN, BA, CHTP, plays the harmonium and has extensive experience with leading devotional chanting in the community. For chanting, Jon draws inspiration originally from Ram Dass’ “From Bindu to Ojas” record album, Krishna Das, “Jai Uttal,” and Robert Gass. He has released 4 CDs, including his newest: “Chanting is Universal!”

 

Wellness Article

Saturated fat does not clog the arteries: coronary heart disease is a chronic inflammatory condition, the risk of which can be effectively reduced from healthy lifestyle interventions
British Journal of Sports Medicine
by Aseem Malhotra, Rita F Redberg, Pascal Meier

Coronary artery disease pathogenesis and treatment urgently requires a paradigm shift. Despite popular believe among doctors and the public, the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong. A landmark systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies showed no association between saturated fat consumption and (1) all-cause mortality, (2) coronary heart disease (CHS), (3) CHD mortality, (4) ischaemic stroke or (5) type 2 diabetes in healthy adults. Similarly in the secondary prevention of CHD there is no benefit from reduced fat, including saturated fat, on myocardial infarction, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality. It is instructive to note that in an angiographic study of postmenopausal women with CHD, greater intake of saturated fat was associated with less progression of atherosclerosis whereas carbohydrate and polyunsaturated fat intake were associated with greater progression. (source)

Wellness Article

Excess Light Exposure May Take Toll on Muscles and Bones
The New York Times
by Sunpreet Singh

Every day people are exposed to hours of artificial light from a variety of sources – computers, video games, office lights and, for some, 24-hour lighting in hospitals and nursing homes. Now new research in animals shows that excessive exposure to “light pollution” may be worse for your health than previously known, taking a toll on muscles and bone strength.

Researchers at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands tracked the health of rats exposed to six months of continuous light compared to a control group of rats living under normal light-dark conditions – 12 hours of light, followed by 12 hours of dark.

During the study, the rats exposed to continuous light had less muscle strength and developed signs of early-stage osteoporosis. They also got fatter and had higher blood glucose levels. Several markers of immune system health also worsened, according to the report published in the medical journal Current Biology. (source)

Wellness Resource

Is Teff the New Super Grain?
The New York Times
by Anahad O’Connor

When Laura Ingalls, an avid runner from Boston, found out after a routine blood test that she was iron-deficient, she turned to the kitchen instead of the medicine cabinet: She started eating teff.

A grain the size of a poppy seed that hails from Ethiopia, teff is naturally high in minerals and protein. Ms. Ingalls started baking with it, cooking with it, and using it to make hot cereal with coconut oil. Now she loves it so much that she doesn’t run a race without it.

“Teff is like a runner’s super food,” she said. “It’s great as a pre-race meal. It’s high in iron and it’s a whole grain so it provides a slow release of energy, which is exactly what I need.”

Teff has long been a dietary staple for Ethiopia’s legendary distance runners, like the Olympic gold medalist and world record holder Haile Gebrselassie, who called teff a secret to the success of Ethiopian runners. But now teff is becoming a go-to grain for a growing number of Americans.

Endurance athletes like the grain because it’s naturally high in minerals. People who can’t tolerate gluten use teff as an alternative to wheat. And dietitians recommend teff as a way for Americans to introduce more whole grains into their diets.

The growing interest in teff is part of an increasing consumer desire for so-called ancient grains like faro, quinoa, spelt, amaranth and millet. Health-conscious consumers have been gravitating to these grains because they’re nutrient dense and have not been genetically modified. (source)

Wellness Resource

Obesity and Diabetes Tied to Liver Cancer
The New York Times
by Nicholas Bakalar

A large study has found that body mass index, waist circumference and diabetes are all associated with an increased risk for liver cancer. Liver cancer is the sixth most common cancer, and its incidence has tripled since the mid-1970s in the United States.

For the study, in Cancer Research, researchers pooled data from 14 prospective studies with more than 1.5 million participants. After controlling for age, sex, alcohol use, smoking and race, they found that being overweight increased the relative risk for liver cancer by between 21 percent and 142 percent as B.M.I increased. For each 2-inch increase in waist circumference, the risk of liver cancer increased by 8 percent, even after controlling for B.M.I. And those with Type 2 diabetes had more than double the risk for liver cancer, even among the non-obese.

There was no association of B.M.I. with cancer if the patient had hepatitis, a cause of liver cancer so strong that it overwhelms any other cause. But among those without hepatitis, the increased risk was significant.

“This study underscores that the parallel increase in obesity is part of the increase in liver cancer rates,” said the lead author, Peter T. Campbell, an epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society. “Now we have to accept the fact that obesity and Type 2 diabetes are strongly associated with liver cancer.”

Wellness Resources

Educate Your Immune System
New York Times
by Moises Velasquez-Manoff
In the last half century, the prevalence of auto immune disease – disorders in which the immune system attacks healthy tissue in the body – has increased sharply in the developed world. An estimated one in 13 Americans has one of these often debilitating, generally lifelong conditions. Many, like Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, are linked with specific gene variants of the immune system, suggesting a strong genetic component. But their prevalence has increased much faster – in two or three generations – than it’s likely the human gene pool has changed.

Many researchers are interested in how the human microbiome – the community of microbes that live mostly in the gut and are thought to calibrate our immune system – may have contributed to the rise of these disorders. Perhaps society-wide shifts in these microbial communities, driven by changes in what we eat and in the quantity and type of microbes we’re exposed to in our daily lives, have increased our vulnerability.

To test this possibility, some years ago, a team of scientist began following 33 newborns who were genetically at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes, a condition in which the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas.

The children were mostly Finnish. Finland has the highest prevalence – nearly one in 200 under the age of 15 – of Type 1 diabetes in the world. (At about one in 300, in the United States isn’t far behind.) After three years, four of the children developed the condition. The scientists had periodically sampled the children’s microbes, and when they looked back at the record, they discovered that the microbiome of children who developed the disease changed in predictable ways nearly a year before the disease appeared. Diversity declined and inflammatory microbes bloomed. It was as if a gradually maturing ecosystem had been stuck by the blight and overgrown by weeds. (source)

Wellness Resource

How Much Added Sugar Is Too Much?
NutritionFacts
by Michael Greger, M.D.
In 1776 – at the time of the American Revolution – Americans consumed about 4 lbs of sugar per person each year. By 1850, this had risen to 20 lbs, and by 1994, to 120 lbs, and now we are closer to 160. Half of that is fructose, taking up about 10% of our diet. This is not from eating apples, but rather the fact that we’re each guzzling the equivalent of a 16-oz soft drink every day; that’s about 50 gallons a year.

Even researchers paid by the likes of the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group and The Coca-Cola Company, acknowledge that sugar is empty calories, containing no essential micronutrients, and therefore if we’re trying to reduce calorie intake, reducing sugar consumption is obviously the place to start.

Concern has been raised, though, that sugar calories may be worst than just empty. A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that the fructose added to foods and beverages in the form of table sugar and high fructose corn syrup in large enough amounts can trigger processes that lead to liver toxicity and other chronic diseases.

Fructose hones in like a laser beam on the liver, and like alcohol, fructose can increase the fat in the liver, increasing the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is one of the most remarkable medical developments over the past 3 decades – the emergence of fatty liver inflammation as a public health problem here and around the globe. (source)

Preventing Cancer

HOWARD WEBBy Howard Jacobson
No disease is as feared or misunderstood as cancer. Because of this fear and confusion, a diagnosis can shake us to our core. At which point, we’re especially vulnerable to bad advice from the medical establishment, as well as unproven and potentially harmful “alternative” modalities.

While there are many ways of treating cancer, and different cancers have radically different potential outcomes, the best policy is always – when possible – prevention. This article will compare the evidence for the mainstream prevention strategy – early detection – with the kids of diet and lifestyle changes I promote.

You’ll discover that you have a lot more control over your health destiny than we’ve been taught.

Mainstream Prevention: Early Detection and Screening
When you stop to think about it, early detection does not “prevent” cancer. Instead, in theory, it catches cancer early enough to do something about it.

So the question is, does population-wide screening of asymptomatic people help us “do something about it” in a way that reduces suffering, disability, and death. Turns out that with the exception of the pap smear for cervical cancer, screening actually may harm more people than it helps.

The Cochrane Collaboration, a non-profit health research group that does not receive funding from industry, has determined that mammography for early detection of breast cancer has the following risk/benefits profile:

If 2000 women receive biannual mammography for 10 years:
-One woman will be saved from death by breast cancer.
-10 women will be treated for cancers they do not have or that would never have been detectable or become significant (through partial or complete amputation of the breast and/or drug treatments).
-200 women will have a “false alarm” and experience, for a time, all psychological stresses of believing they have cancer when in fact they are perfectly fine.
-2000 women will undergo painful mammograms with these radiation screenings increase the risk of lung cancer and heart disease.

For more information on the science behind these statements, check out Gilbert Welch’s book, Overdiagnosed.

The risk/benefits profiles for population-based PSA testing for prostate cancer and colonoscopies for colorectal cancer are similar. They harm more people than they help, and turn hundreds of thousands of perfectly healthy people into worried patients. (For more information, see The Great Prostate Hoax, by Richard Ablin with Ronald Piana.)

So if we can’t “prevent” cancer through screening, what can we do? Are we powerless to change our fate, or do we just have to wait until we get sick enough to need treatment? And at that point, isn’t it often too late?

To answer that question, we have to look directly at cancer and its causes.

What Causes Cancer? Learn more…

Partner Personal Training

PARTNER TRAINING

Get healthier as spring rolls along!
This new offering at WHS could be just what you need to get ready for summer’s activities. An exercise partner helps you remain motivated and accountable. With similar goals for your workouts, you can both make progress and save a little money. It could also just be fun to spend time with a friend getting healthier.

MELANIE DEAN, M. Sc., CSCS, holds a Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology in addition to her Bachelor’s degree in Human Performance & Wellness. Among her certifications are: NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and NSPA Post Rehab Specialist.

Tuesdays & Thursdays by appointment. Call 919.489.5355 to schedule.